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Are you going to buy an Xbox One X This Holiday Season?

Yes
No
Maybe
Hope to Receive it as a Gift


Game Profile
 Written by Chris Reiter  on September 08, 2004

Specials: You do realize that it took about $2,500 to?make this list, don't you?


Welcome back to the wonderful world of ME!?Last week?you saw my top 25 games (top as in the bottom half) off of my 50 Best list, and today you'll journey through my top half (or the bottom 25). In case you missed yesterday's edition (which you shouldn't have), click here for the scoop: The Certain, Definite, and Exact 50 Best PlayStation 2 Games of All-Time by Me: Part I

As for the rest of you, prepare to be whisked away from up in the middle toward downward little and little until the?anticipated number one is revealed... ?

25. Onimusha: Warlords
Publisher:
Capcom
Developer: Capcom Production Studio 2/Flagship
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: March 15, 2001 ?

Blending action and horror themes together within a 16th century Japan overrun with demonic figures, Onimusha: Warlords was as beautiful as it was fun to play being one of the earliest smash successes for the PlayStation 2 console. It's after the daring samurai soldier named Samanosuke chases after Princess Yuki that he fails and is met by a mystical ogre clan, given the chance to redeem himself by having a magical gauntlet latched around his arm. Samanosuke now has the power to suck souls of the vile demons he defeats into this device to allow him to revitalize his decreasing status gauges. Most impressive in the game were the pre-rendered environments and characters that made up the game's gothic entirety. Samanosuke and his partner Kaede move around fantastically. Especially in Kaede's case, where she can literally flip over enemies to slit their throat from behind. Outside Onimusha: Warlords, I haven't played another title in the series. But I will say that Onimusha by itself is an amazing feat, beating out a good portion of other PlayStation 2 titles on the market. ?

24. Dead or Alive 2: Hardcore
Publisher:
Tecmo
Developer: Team Ninja
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 26, 2000 ?

Even if the PlayStation 2's launch wasn't as hot as it should have been, there were a few titles that stood out. Dead or Alive 2: Hardcore was one of the pinnacles that really made owning a PlayStation 2 worth it for those who didn't already own a Dreamcast. Hardcore is of course Tecmo's upgrade to the arcade-translated fighting game that's fast and fluent as they come. Easy to manage, you can become a Dead or Alive 2 master quickly with its intuitive kicking, punching, flipping, grabbing, wall-pounding, and edge pushing combos. What the Dead or Alive series is also best known for its sex appeal. Lots and lots of butts and breasts that jiggle and wiggle soooo niiiicely. Want to touch the Kasumi! Uh...other than that, unlockable outfits, several game modes, and interesting fighting arenas that have multiple levels and areas you can break through put forth the test of the smooth visuals and sound elements. Where lesser and lesser fighting titles have been popping up in recent years, I feel Dead or Alive 2: Hardcore is one of the best that's hit the next-gen era.

?
23. Wild Arms 3
Publisher:
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Developer: MediaVision
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 15, 2002

? Falling into my second place slot, for which of the three Wild Arms reigns supreme, the third Wild Arms is a very interesting approach to the franchise, and one that holds up a lot better than the previous weaker attempt made in the second game. Now using four characters instead of the usual three, the third Wild Arms takes the series into a cel-shading world for a first. Another first is that the battle system's gone from a standstill turn-based style to a Grandia-like run-amok turn-based one. Characters run circles around one another while they fight, with your four guys (well, one of them being a girl) each possessing a gun of their own brand. The Western-themed story about each of the quartet's pasts catching up with them, and the future that stands ahead is an epic journey that unfolds through the game's desert lands. Strong Japanese music inspires here too, in another PlayStation 2 RPG great that I won't ever want to forget. ?

22. Magic Pengel: The Quest for Color
Publisher:
Agetec
Developer: Garakuta-Studio/Taito
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: June 24, 2003 ?

There aren't many video games out there that focus on the art of drawing. But for the ones there are, I think they're some of the best. Magic Pengel, like Mario Paint before it, situates itself as a drawing-based game. Only, this is an RPG that renders its artistry abilities as more than just some gimmick. In Magic Pengel, you not only draw whatever type of doodles you want using all different types of body parts, but you can use them to come to life and fight for you to in order to win more colors and more options with which to create masterpieces with. Following a story of a world where only few people posses the ability to create art, you'll play as a faceless and bodiless one who is one of these human remnants, and who is essentially you. Magic Pengel's art style I would have to say is one of greatness, as it's similar in ways to Nintendo's cel-shaded The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker. But also, there is a blending of your 2D creatures that become 3D when you're able to add wings, multiple eyes or legs, or whatever, and then view them in 3D as you would anything else. And the techniques used; all of it is literally breathtaking. The first time I learned about Magic Pengel, I was somewhat skeptical of how it'd turn out to be. Though, I'm extremely happy I had a chance to play through this obscure classic. ?

21. Okage: Shadow King
Publisher:
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Developer: Zener Works/SCEI
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 2, 2001 ?

If Hollywood director Tim Burton -- creator of some of the most bizarre films ever -- were to make a video game, Okage: Shadow King would be that video game. Okage stands as one of the best and most unique PlayStation 2 RPGs, as its story, its characters, and its entire world all culminate together to bring gamers a game that in being different works to its advantage. When young Ari is put in the position where the only option to save his pig-Latin speaking sister is by sharing his shadow with Evil King Stanley Hihat Trinidad XIV (or Stan) and becoming his slave, his adventure to set out and help gather Stan's stolen power has only just begun. In this unlikely duo's quest, they'll team up with other character's whose agendas only lend a hand into the odd and hilarious tale of Ari's amusing misfortune. An easy-to-use RPG combat system levels out in between the Nightmare Before Christmas-inspired visuals, and soothing sounds. Okage oozes with creativity in a game that's so unlike the typical titles, as it makes for one of the best games ever. ?

20. Gran Turismo 3 A-Spec
Publisher:
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Developer: Polyphony Digital
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: July 10, 2001 ?

Many say Gran Turismo 3 is the best racing game there ever was created. While I can't see that being far from the truth, I wouldn't say it is the truth. Rather, I'd say Gran Turismo 3 has become the best simulator of racing games ever. I don't know how they did it, but Polyphony Digital, the developers, has carved a digital reality that looks straight out of life we live and breathe in every day right into Gran Turismo 3's own. The cars, the tracks...they all appear close enough to watching a racing game on television (which, in a way this really is). But, also the gameplay in Gran Turismo 3 is top notch, all with lots of different modes and a garage to tune your choices from hundreds of different cars available to master the tracks with. Music in the game ranges from some very nice choices too, like Lenny Kravitz and Papa Roach. There are reasons why so many people think of this game with high regards. ?

19. Devil May Cry
Publisher:
Capcom
Developer: Capcom Production Studio 4
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 17, 2001 ?

Cool is the code of conduct in Devil May Cry, Capcom's revered gothic actioneer title. Executing combos with the stroke of a sword and the shot of a gun put Devil May Cry on the map with its white-haired, red-coated, half-devil hero, named Dante. He flips off walls, he balances enemies in the air, he even turns from man to devil to wreak havoc on the forces of evil he hunts for. With the game's stylish kick ass and item hunt gameplay, its dazzling visual effects, and some great sounds too, Devil May Cry is a splendid mix of action and horror in one, and any "best of" games list wouldn't be a list without this amazing a game. ?

18. Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 3
Publisher:
Activision
Developer: Neversoft Entertainment
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 30, 2001 ?

Way beyond any Tony Hawk game before it, Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 3 was the first installment to drastically change the series in a number of ways. Guy skaters were out, and girl skaters were in. A vast array of interchangeable skater options from hats, to glasses, to shoes, to pants, to shirts, even to jewelry and tattoos could be added to your customizable characters. Creating skate parks is another addition that was first added here, as were levels that were much grander than they've ever been. A new revert trick that provided for long stretches of linked combos was another big thing. Moreover, Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 3 was the first-ever online game for the PlayStation 2 to launch in America. With a vaster degree of 3D detailed goodness and much, much more music to listen to as well, the impact Tony Hawk 3 made upon the gaming world at its time gives it an undeniable precedence over any Hawk that has arrived before or after it. ?

17. Dark Cloud
Publisher:
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Developer: Level-5
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: May 28, 2001

? Originally supposed to be a launch title for the PlayStation 2, Dark Cloud was pushed back into the next year like many of its other initial games. But without a doubt, the wait was worth it. Dark Cloud is really the first "great" RPG for the PlayStation 2 you could say, where its innovation builds off a combination of things. Using games like The Legend of Zelda and Actraiser as its basis, Dark Cloud puts you in a world where you can build worlds. Wait, let me rephrase that a bit. You're Toan who with the help of different party members will traverse into the depths of dungeons to battle all sorts of creatures to collect pieces of different towns, in order to restore them to their natural self. You can place the pieces wherever you want, but it's by conversing with the inhabitants of the town where you'll learn their preferences. Using these as guidelines help to master the art of placement. Another of Dark Cloud's best known aspects was the high level of detail that went into the lustrous game. The game's sounds were another thing to behold, as the music of the dungeons was captivating. One of the first RPG greats for the PS2, Dark Cloud is also one of my all-time best picks. ?

16. Silent Hill 2
Publisher:
Konami
Developer: Konami TYO
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: September 25, 2001 ?

Resident Evil may have brought horror games into the mainstream, but it was Silent Hill that was too busy thinking about how would it was going to rip our eyeballs out of our sockets. Silent Hill, a late bloomer in the PlayStation's life, is the horror title that started the franchise on its way to fame. But Silent Hill 2 I think is the one that produces a higher level of psychotic mayhem. And psychotic mayhem equals the better scares in a better game. In this first next-gen Silent Hill entry, we find new character James Sanderson in search of his dead wife who contacted him from the town of -- you guessed it -- Silent Hill. Even creepier is that inside Silent Hill, monsters pop out from their hiding places and are now trying to kill James, including the sickly, deranged, giant sword wielding creature known as Pyramid Head. Ground-scuttling deformities, live mannequins, and updated nurses with skin for faces and bone curdling screams make for progression further shocking. Advanced graphics and sounds of course help to flesh out the grimmest Hell that Silent Hill is. ?

15. Midnight Club II
Publisher:
Rockstar Games
Developer: Rockstar San Diego
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: April 8, 2003 ?

Before Rockstar introduced us to Midnight Club: Street Racing, the first title in this fabulous racing series, I don't think underground racing was even heard of in video games. And so with a franchise like this, you'd have to expect a sequel. This is that sequel, and is one that gets my vote as the best next-gen racer you're going to find. Gran Turismo 3 is a very good game, though I'm more for the arcade genre. Midnight Club II follows the style of its predecessor: you find an opponent, you beat them and their crew, then you earn their respect and best of all their vehicles. Differing from the previous installment, the second Club now heads to three new cities (Los Angeles, Paris, and Tokyo) where the game with the best motorcycle maneuvers and physics has been realized (even vastly improved compared to the ones from Vice City). And with online modes and improved graphics, Midnight Club II makes for a hella cool racer: faster than the fast and furiouser than the furious. ?

14. Medal of Honor: Frontline
Publisher:
Electronic Arts
Developer: DreamWorks Interactive
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: May 30, 2002 ?

There is a lot of World War II-themed shooters available, but from what I've played Frontline has captured the thematics of this gripping era of war the best. As the third Medal of Honor in the series, Frontline starts players off on a boat heading for the climatic battle on Omaha Beach. As James Patterson, the game is played out like any Medal of Honor -- scripted moments and such -- but the drama, the action, the emotion of it all is so all beautifully fitted into what seems like the closest any game has come to virtually letting you be in this war. In such epic levels, like the aforementioned beach breach to a ruined city in rubble to the partnership you'll form with British allies, the game gets the right mood for each scenario with amazing graphical details, authentic battles (using fixed machine guns, to shotguns, to Panzer rockets against Nazi battalions), and an impressive array of sound elements (voices, music, and audio -- all brilliant). Though probably not the best World War II First Person Shooter available, Frontline is the best one I've ever played, and that's what counts. ?

13. Zone of the Enders
Publisher:
Konami
Developer: Konami JPN
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: March 27, 2001 ?

Surprisingly in 2001, even when I first found out the MGS2 demo would be shipping with Zone of the Enders, I still wasn't really interested in buying the game. I figured Zone of the Enders would be some anime-like robotic combat game that really wouldn't hold my interest for long. But, an employee of GameStop assured me this game was going to be big. He described it in a way that you'd be the robot high above the small Earth below you. As you came closer to the ground, it would get bigger, of course. I don't remember if that was the exact message he was describing, but whatever he said, I put my money down on the game. The day Zone of the Enders was released, I naturally popped in the MGS2 demo first as that was the real game I was waiting for. It was heaven. But then I figured I might as well try this Zone game out. I didn't know it would become one of my favorite games of all time. It's a magnificent story about a boy who befriends a robot in the middle of a war that its villains seek to capture the prize: the very robot you'll use against them. Luscious anime-like 3D visuals, emotional grade A voice work (even with Leon's "girlie" voice), and some of the fastest most fluid robotic combat you'll ever know is all in Zone's masterpiece title. A game in which I played many more times than I did the demo that came with it. ?

12. Zone of the Enders 2: The 2nd Runner
Publisher:
Konami
Developer: Konami JPN
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: March 11, 2003 ?

Most gamers' thought the first Zone of the Enders was nothing. I thought it was everything. Two years later, Konami's sequel arrived. Having to decide which was better between the two Zone of the Enders game was a bit difficult. The first one is so unforgettable as it follows the exploits of a boy who wants nothing to do with a war, and a robot who's lifeless personality develops with the boy inside of her. Now we come to the second game, where its scope of gameplay has significantly improved. Where the first game let you dash around in the air, spinning, tossing, slicing and dicing your robot foes up to a few at a time, the second game adds more. A lot more to be exact. The second game ups the tempo of combat as you'll be facing massive swarms of enemies at different points. You can now grab objects within the environment too, to use as shields or weapons. In mixtures of the first game's 3D now with actual 2D anime movies, the graphics look fantastic, and the voice work and sounds are inspiring as ever. Both Zones are in the zone...but the second one, for my money, is the best one of the irresistible two. ?

11. Virtua Fighter 4
Publisher:
Sega
Developer: Sega-AM2
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: March 19, 2002 ?

Sleekness is what I think about when I think of Virtua Fighter 4. Its virtual menu, its stylistic and fluid combat, its very impressive visuals and sounds make Virtua Fighter 4 a fighter you can't back down from. Who'd had thunk Sega would ever be taken off the hardware list, or even be putting a game on a Nintendo or Sony console? I wouldn't have seen that coming at first. But it happened, and I'm not disappointed. For, the games make a system first and foremost. And, Sega making Virtua Fighter 4 has been one of the greatest pleasures I've known in all my years of gaming. It brings in brand-spanking new levels with lush graphics and all sorts of moves that can be made up on the fly. Like the monk character in the game, he can switch from one kind of stance to another, and keep on churning out revitalizing Shaolin-whatevers at opponents. The stages themselves take place in areas like an underwater cage, or my favorite, on top a building at night fall with a chopper and its light beaming off and circling around the fighters of the ring. Way better than Soul Calibur II any day of the week, Virtua Fighter 4 is the best next-gen fighting game I've had the opportunity to own. ?

10. Twisted Metal: Black
Publisher:
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Developer: Incog Inc. Entertainment
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: June 19, 2001

? Twisted Metal is the definitive for car combat. When the series' developer Single Trac had abandoned its post and 989 Studios filled in for the two PlayStation sequels after that, it was later when former members of the Single Trac team revealed they were coming together to form Incog Inc. Entertainment, and to bring back the Twisted Metal series in a brand-new release. Black is that game, and what a stunning achievement it has become. Black takes a turn into the darker side of all things Twisted Metal. As the first and really only Mature rated Twisted Metal (besides its online iteration), you take to the wheel as both new and old drivers all with new weapons and creative specials, such as the series' favorite Sweet Tooth whose ice cream truck now transforms into a killing robot. The story itself is much deeper, with Calypso in charge of the boss activities again. Sweet Tooth a big cheese? Please... The graphics in Black are highly detailed, as is the sound with the catchy "Paint it Black" by The Rolling Stones. Though Black is a step back from what I'd call as the best Twisted Metal ever (Twisted Metal 2), it's still up there as one of the most enjoyable car combative games of all time.

?
9. ICO
Publisher:
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Developer: Sony Computer Entertainment America
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: September 30, 2001 ?

I'd have to say ICO is the most deserving title to ever receive the "sleeper hit" award. It's a game deserving so much more than what it's gotten, as it wasn't played by many. But those who have dived into ICO's bliss are the lucky ones. I myself wasn't sure about ICO...until I played its magnifcient demo off the PlayStation Underground CD that released the summer beofre the game's release. I must have gone through the demo about five times, since I was so struck in awe by its wonderous entirety. ICO triumphs in so much, because it's an adventure game so unlike any before it. You're a horned boy trapped inside a castle when the villagers put you there, but then you find a mysterious girl also within the castle's walls. Together the two form a team: the boy solves puzzles and battles the shadow demons out to capture the girl, and the girl unlocks the magic doors that seal the exits you want to go through. This all works especially with the artistic beauty in graphics and sound achievements, as does the short sided yet involving storyline of the boy, the girl, and the dark shadow mother out to snatch Yorda out from ICO's hands. While the game itself is short in length, it's one of the brightest spectacles in games I've ever endured and no doubt you might think so for yourself. ?

8. Jak II
Publisher:
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Developer: Naught Dog Software
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 14, 2003 ?

Close to being just as brilliant as its former Jak and Daxter entry, the second Jak takes off the kid-friendly mask and gives its hero Jak a darker persona in a meaner world. In a Grand Theft Auto-inspired Haven City, the environment is even bigger than in the first game. Unfortunately the thing that made the second Jak less enjoyable was because it actually takes a while to navigate the hub of Haven (it's a really huge ass city) because it's overflowing with random NPCs and the vehicles they ride on too. Though, with Jak's new dark powers and a ton of new enemy types to deal death to in newly stylized challenges, the freshness of the Jak series lives on. And of course, the graphics and sounds remain gorgeous in this sequel to one of the greatest platform games of all time (and one of my absolute favorites).

?
7. Red Faction
Publisher:
THQ
Developer: Volition, Inc.
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: May 22, 2001 ?

A man looking for a new life heads to Mars to join up with Ultor, a mining company who promises a better life. But when Parker finds out it's actually a program for enslaving workers ruled by the manipulative Ultor, he becomes the spark of the revolution toward freedom. Along in this mission you'll find aid from a hacker working for Ultor and secretly against them, as well as the leader of the underground movement out to put Ultor in their place. Red Faction I'd have to say is my favorite First Person Shooter of all time. It's so different from your typical shooter, as you have the ability to blast through walls (and even walk straight through them) and alter the environment at your leisure (such as destroying cavern-made bridges enemies stoop on). With a futuristic assortment of land, sea and air-based vehicles, awesome weapons like the body heat detecting rocket launcher, and marvelous visuals and sound aspects, I was blown away by all Red Faction had to offer, more so than any other shooter of its ilk. ?

6. Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy
Publisher:
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Developer: Naughty Dog Software
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: December 4, 2001

? In an unexpected move, Sony's unofficial mascot series (Crash Bandicoot) was handed over to Universal on a silver platter in 2001. What was to become of the next project for the series' makers and one of the most influential developers ever, Naughty Dog, had been kept a secret until the summer before its launch. What was so great about this game that couldn't be spoken of? Everything. Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy is by far the best platform game under Sony's belt. It's also one of the best games in existence I feel, as its world thrives on a colorful, comical, and creative arrangement of things. Based in a massive gameplay arena (think a giant island) without load times, you could head over to one part of the game level up top and look down upon its other sections. The scope of the environment is literally enormous. And playing as the elfin boy Jak who has his friend turned orange rodent Daxter on his back, is highly enjoyable, as completing various odd jobs for the people of the land entertains with spinning and shooting techniques. There's even vehicle-based missions, and of course visual and sound details that only slobber can describe. ?

5. Grand Theft Auto III
Publisher:
Rockstar Games
Developer: DMA Design
Platform: PlayStation
Release: October 23, 2001

? The year 2001 is definitely one of the most memorable for great games. But when it came down to it, the best-selling game that year and for a long time after that had been Grand Theft Auto III, which is the very game that sparked some of the media's largest controversy topics. Introducing gamers' to a 3D New York-inspired city where you could progress through most missions in any order you wanted, stealing any vehicle you wanted, killing anyone you wanted, the game got people of all ages wanting to play it. Not since Mortal Kombat had a game been this hot to trot for not tots. In Grand Theft Auto III, you could literally kill cops, crooks, or civilians all with a battalion of weaponry: from a sniper rifle to a flamethrower. You could run away from the law in a wide variety of vehicles, or engage in odd jobs like becoming a criminal-busting outlaw under the police banner yourself. And with nicely fitting 3D graphics and a variety of?very hilarious radio stations to tune into, Grand Theft Auto III was something you could waste hours away on performing the sickest of deranged actions and forget you even had a life once. ?

4. Grand Theft Auto: Vice City
Publisher:
Rockstar Games
Developer: Rockstar North
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 29, 2002 ?

I don't think anyone first thought the Grand Theft Auto franchise would eventually lead to stardom. When the earlier Grand Theft Auto games were released, they were good games, but not the amazingly nonlinear and addictive action Mafioso titles we've known them for. When word of mouth spread that Grand Theft Auto III would become the hottest selling title in 2001, it was natural that Rockstar would follow up on its extreme success. No one would think it'd be a year later when Rockstar would come up with a better title that sports a retro 80's fake Miami City, sporting more weapons, more vehicles (including motorcycles), more things to do in newer mission types, better graphics, and a whole lot of classic 80's music from all genre types. With many Hollywood actors on board as well, Vice City became not just a Grand Theft Auto III repeat, but a bigger and better one at that. ?

3. Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht
Publisher:
Namco
Developer: Monolith Software
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: February 25, 2003 ?

2003's. Best. Game. Most critics it seems denied Xenosaga the rights to that claim because its game movies were too long. Well, what about Xenogears' dialogue? Wasn't reading a full newspaper every character you talked to too long as well? I for one would rather watch the movie than read the book. But maybe that's just me. Anyway, Xenosaga has the makings of one of the best games ever, I think, because it pushes the envelope just about everywhere you look. You want the absolute best in 3D anime-inspired characters? You've got it. You want wickedly cool voices that match each and every character's personality rightly? You've got it. You want a better-than-going-to-the-movies story? You've got it. You want an in and out of mecha battle system with some of the most impressive attacks? You've got that too. Also with tons of mini-games like one that's similar to poker, or side quests like one that's an Easter egg hunt for new parts, and more than 80 hours of gameplay, Xenosaga aspires straight to number three. ?

2. Final Fantasy X
Publisher:
Square Electronic Arts
Developer: Squaresoft
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: December 18, 2001 ?

As the first Final Fantasy game to move into the next-generation of video games, Final Fantasy X has ultimately become the best RPG of the next-generation. Tracing away again from the medieval-style period of most Final Fantasy games, the tenth installment is more like the eighth in its own type of modernized era. In fact, the game takes place 1,000 years after the game's main character is transported into the future by the destructive creature known as Sin. Final Fantasy X's beauty runs deeper than that, though, through its amazing visuals, classic soundtrack, and what I feel is the best combat system integrated into any Final Fantasy release. Now with the chance to replace characters in your party with ones that are not in your party strategically, Final Fantasy X is one of the most extremely enjoyable RPGs you'll love for the appetizing aspects and stay for the dynamic plot twists. ?

1. Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty
Publisher:
Konami
Developer: Konami JPN
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: November 13, 2001 ?

And here it is, the best game you'll ever know. Honestly, I can say Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty features the most epic qualities imaginable on any and all fronts. Like Metal Gear Solid before it, Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty reinvents the definition of stealth/action tenfold. Here, you'll traverse heavily guarded enemy territory in a 3D state that effectively gives the game's protagonist Solid Snake the full potential of his surroundings. With some of this generation's best visuals and sounds on all accords, memorable bosses and stages, high replay value (with multiple difficulty stages and tons of dog tags to collect), and a highly unexpected twist on the storyline (adding in a very interesting perspective from the new character's point of view), this all makes for an unbeatably winning combination of legendary gaming bliss. Hideo, you genius you! ?

That's it! No more! Past 1 there's 0, and I can't think of any game I'd give a 0 to...well, maybe there's one or two that come to mind. Whether you're in agreement?with me or not though, this my list for the 50 best PlayStation 2 games of all-time. Want to praise, comment, argue, or maybe dump a bucket of hot coals on my head for choosing the choices you didn't? Come visit the
Gaming Target forums to discuss today!



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