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Which game will you play the most this month?

Call of Duty Advanced Warfare
Halo The Master Chief Collection
Super Smash Bros for Wii U
LittleBigPlanet 3
Assassins Creed Unity


Game Profile
FINAL SCORES
9.4
Visuals
9.0
Audio
9.0
Gameplay
9.0
Features
10
Replay
9.0
INFO BOX
PLATFORM:
Nintendo 64
PUBLISHER:
Nintendo
DEVELOPER:
Nintendo
GENRE: Platform
PLAYERS:   1
RELEASE DATE:
September 26, 1996
ESRB RATING:
Everyone
IN THE SERIES
Super Mario Bros. 3DS

Super Mario All-Stars

Super Mario Galaxy 2

New Super Mario Bros. Wii

Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story

More in this Series
 Written by Matt Swider  on June 22, 2000

Review: So, I am guessing Luigi gets his own game later too...right?


Nintendo's first game stared none other than a Mario, presenting the first true 3-D game for any system at its time. The game lets you explore, get lost, and have fun. The level size is much, much bigger than many other videogames when it was released. After playing this game, I knew why Mario was the man for Nintendo's first game.

The visuals are the most advanced I have ever seen in compared to any game before it. Mario has plenty of animation including falling asleep when you put down the controller to nearly stepping off a tall building, leaning back and forth. The graphics may be rich in texture, but one of the problems is clipping. Clipping is when a character goes too close to a wall and you can see right through the wall or object. The game also has many camera problems, but with the truly breath taking 3-D graphics you won't even notice.

The controls in Super Mario64 are well done with the analog stick in the N64 controller. He walks when you move the analog stick slightly forward and starts running when you move it even farther. This was the first game to show this ability.

The audio is like you would expect in any Mario game, cheesy yet, classics. The music fits well in the game especially because it was put onto a cart. The music sets the mode for the stage, so when you play the music matches. The sound effect range from "It's aaaa me Mario" to "owwwwwwwoooowwww". Many sounds have been put into the game for to match Mario's action like when Mario falls, he also yells. The sound is a big jump from anything SNES could do, Mario's Italian voice is just what I expected. "Maaaammmaaa Miaa".

Was I satisfied? Definitely. The game shows the 3-D environment of Mario World with very little glitches such as the camera angles. With Mario 64 being Nintendo's first N64 game. I have to say I am quite impressed.

I would replay SM64 more than once. This game offers a couple of replay options with its large level size and nice looking graphics, you'll want to come back and play this one again, you know you will. A game with Mario in it makes me feel at home again with the quality games that Nintendo always has produced.

Bottom Line
Being quite a Platform genre fan, I have to say I enjoyed Nintendo's first N64 game a lot. All Mario games have been both popular and produced with quality through the systems more then three years existence.


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